Tag Archives: pro-life

North Carolina Gov. Patrick L. McCrory (Courtesy)

North Carolina poll: Bush, Walker lead in GOP field; Cooper leads McCory in governor’s race

While among North Carolina Republicans John E. “Jeb” Bush, a former governor of Florida, leads a crowded field of Republican candidates, with 18 percent of support, his support lags in the state’s Tea Party, where Wisconsin Gov. Scott K. Walker leads him 17 percent to 10 percent, according to an April 30 Gravis Insights of 1,479 registered poll of Tar Heel State voters.

The survey sample was made up of 835 Republicans and 524 Democrats. Questions to Republicans carry a 3 percent margin of error and to Democrats carry a margin of error of 4 percent. Questions to the entire sample population carry a margin of error of 2 percent. The poll was conducted using automated calls and IVR political campaign software technology

The poll also shows strong support for state Attorney General Roy A. Cooper III, a Democrat, who has announced his candidacy in to oppose Republican Gov. Patrick L. McCrory. The former Duke Energy executive, elected in 2012, is running for a second term.

North Carolina Attorney General Roy Cooper

North Carolina Attorney General Roy A. Cooper III (Courtesy)

Cooper leads McCrory with 44 percent to the governor’s 42 percent, said Doug Kaplan, the managing partner of Gravis Insights, the Florida-based firm that conducted the poll. Gravis Insights is a nonpartisan research firm.

In 2008, McCrory lost to Beverly Perdue 50 percent to 47 percent and in 2012 McCrory defeated the incumbent Democrat Lt. Gov. Walter H. Dalton 55 percent 43 percent.

The governor’s approval rating is 33 percent among all voters, 61 percent with the Tea Party, 40 percent with voters in gun owning families and 52 percent with pro-life voters in the latest Gravis telephone survey.

North Carolina voters oppose raising taxes on gasoline, 61 percent to 26 percent. But when they were asked if the federal government should ban online gambling, which on Capitol Hill is purpose of legislation before both the House and Senate, commonly called the “Restore America’s Wire Act” or RAWA.

The poll also tested the strength of Republican candidates against former first lady Hillary R. Clinton, a Democrat.

“Bush and Walker are competitive in every state, but we wanted to see how the GOP race was working inside the different constituencies of the Republican Party,” Kaplan said.

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott K. Walker (Courtesy)

Wisconsin Republican Gov. Scott K. Walker (Courtesy)

In the general Republican race, Florida’s Sen. Marco A. Rubio trails Bush with 16 percent, followed by Walker’s 13 percent, Kaplan said. Former Arkansas governor Michael D. Huckabee with 11 percent and Texas’ Sen. R. Edward Cruz with 8 percent. In the 2008 campaign for the Republican presidential nomination, Huckabee lost the North Carolina primary to Arizona’s Sen. John S. McCain III, 74 percent to 12 percent and finished second to McCain in the overall campaign.

Gravis Marketing Political Poll

Sen. R. Edward “Ted” Cruz (R.-Texas) (Courtesy)

Kaplan said Huckabee is a close-close second to Walker with the Tea Party with 16 percent, followed by Rubio, 14 percent, Cruz 13 percent. “It is a tight group at the top, but there is real separation between the top four and Bush.”

Bush does much better with pro-life Republicans and Republicans from gun owning families, he said.

“There is a tie between Bush and Rubio with pro-life Republicans with both men at 15 percent,” he said. “Both Walker and Huckabee come in with 14 percent and Cruz has the support of 10 percent.”

Cruz, like the others is firmly opposed to abortion, but the gap reflects both his emphasis on different issues and the let down from the pop from his announcement in March, he said.

Both Rubio and Bush are the choice of voters, who own a gun or belong to a family with guns in the home, with the Floridians garnering support of 16 percent, he said. Walker holds close at 13 percent, followed by Huckabee at 11 percent and Cruz at 9 percent.

Kaplan said when Gravis Insights a division of Gravis Marketing polled North Carolina Republican supporters of abortion rights, Bush is the clear favorite with the 27 percent of respondents choosing him. Bush is followed by Rubio at 20 percent, but then there is a sharp drop off.

Among GOP voters, who support abortion rights, Walker and Cruz have the support of 11 percent and Huckabee has the support of 10 percent.

John E. "Jeb" Bush (Courtesy)

John E. “Jeb” Bush (Courtesy)

North Carolina has a reputation as a conservative state, which it is, but it has a significant liberal twinge that leads it to go for President Barack Obama in 2008 and to elect Democratic senators and governors with far more regularity than South Carolina or Georgia. In fact, when McCrory won the 2012 governor’s race, he was the first Republican governor elected since 1988.

This purple streak in North Carolina politics reflects the influence of the state’s colleges and universities that have long been liberal sanctuaries, the influx of northerners attracted by the state’s high-tech and industrial revival and the black vote that accounts for more than 20 percent of the general election turnout in 2014.

According to the Gravis/Townhall poll, former secretary of state Hillary R. Clinton is running strong against the leading Republican candidates. She is consistently in the high 40s against the Republicans with the variation coming with each candidates own popularity and slight swings in the number of undecided voters.

Clinton is in a virtual-tie with Bush, 45 percent to Bush’s 44 percent and against Rubio, Clinton leads 46 percent to Rubio’s 45 percent. Clinton leads Walker 47 percent to in 45 percent. Clinton leads Huckabee 47 percent to 44 percent. Clinton leads Cruz 48 to 44 percent.

Do approve or disapprove of President Obama’s job performance?


Do approve or disapprove of Governor McCrory’s Job Performance?


If the North Carolina Republican Primary for President was held today and the candidates were Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio, Carly Fiorina, Chris Christie, Scott Walker, Rand Paul, Ted Cruz, Rick Santorum, Mike Huckabee, and Ben Carson, whom would you vote for?


If the North Carolina Democratic Primary for President was held today and the candidates were Hillary Clinton, Joe Biden, Martin O’Malley, Bernie Sanders, Jim Webb, Lincoln Chafee, and Bill De Blasio, whom would you vote for?


If the North Carolina Democratic Primary for President was held today and the candidates were Hillary Clinton, Martin O’Malley, Bernie Sanders, Jim Webb, Lincoln Chafee, and Bill De Blasio, whom would you vote for?


If the election for Governor were held today and the candidates were Republican Pat McCrory and Democrat Roy Cooper, whom would you vote for?


If the election for Senate were held today and the candidates were Republican Richard Burr and Democrat Kay Hagan, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Jeb Bush and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Rand Paul and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Scott Walker and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Chris Christie and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Mike Huckabee and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Marco Rubio and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


If the election for President were held today and the candidates were Republican Ted Cruz and Democrat Hillary Clinton, whom would you vote for?


Do you believe that Hillary Clinton is a trustworthy and honest individual or not?


Hillary Clinton used a personal email account to conduct government business while working as Secretary of State under the Obama Administration. Does this issue factor into why you think Hillary Clinton is a trustworthy and honest individual or not?


Do you think Congress should ban online gambling?


Do you think Congress should raise the gas tax in order to pay for highways, bridges, and mass transit projects?


Do you or anyone in your family own a gun or firearm?


Do you consider yourself to be Pro-Life or Pro-Choice when it comes to the question of whether or not abortion should be legal?

gotv

NC Poll: 69% Tarheel GOP voters aged 18 to 49 support 20-week abortion ban

Less than two weeks after Rep. Renee Ellmers (R.-N.C.) sabotaged the expected passage of the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act, 69 percent of North Carolina Republicans aged 18 to 49 support the ban on abortions after 20-weeks asked directly without conditions or nuance in aTownhall/Gravis poll of 782 randomly selected registered GOP voters.

Sixty percent of Republicans aged 50 to 64 support the ban, as do 55 percent of GOP voters older than 65, said Doug Kaplan, the managing partner of Gravis Insights, the Florida-based pollster the executed the poll. The Jan. 31 poll carries a margin of error of 3.5 percent.he said.

Ellmers, the chairwoman of the Republican Women’s Policy Committee, signed up as a co-sponsor of , H.R. 36, Jan. 9, but on the Jan. 20 anniversary of the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision the congresswoman withdrew her name as a co-sponsor. In 2013, Ellmers voted for the same bill.

Republican Women's Policy Committee (Courtesy)

Republican Women’s Policy Committee (Courtesy)

Kaplan said 58 percent of all Republican voters, who were asked: “Would you support a federal outlawing abortions after 20 weeks or pregnancy?” said they supported the ban and 27 percent said they were opposed.

Broken down by ethnic communities, 58 percent respondents identifying themselves as Hispanic supported the straight-out 20-week ban, 67 percent of those identifying themselves as Asian, he said.

Kaplan said poll sought to find the solid baseline for opinions on abortion rights without the gaming of questions that other pollsters use to push the results one way or the other.

“By a similar margin, 54 percent to 27 percent, North Carolina Republicans believe the GOP should work to end abortion in America,” he said.

“It was a virtual tie, 41 percent for and 39 percent against, when they were asked if federal law should outlaw all abortions,” he said. Gravis Insights is a non-partisan research firm. The poll were conducted using IVR technology and weighted by selected voting demographics and proprietary modeling.

Rep. Renee L. Ellmers (R.-N.C.)

Rep. Renee L. Ellmers (R.-N.C.)
In a Jan. 21 Facebook post, the congresswoman said: “To clear up any misinformation, I will be voting tomorrow to support H.R. 36 – The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protect Act Resources bill. I have and will continue to be a strong defender of the prolife community.”The post not only distorted her moves against the bill, but also shifted her support from the unborn to the people fighting for the unborn—in effect announcing that she was not longer of the pro-life movement, but was now a sympathetic outsider.

Consistent with her new outsider posture, Ellmers dug in her high heels with aJan. 30 post on her official blog, when she dressed down the advocates for the unborn: “I am appalled by the abhorrent and childish behaviors from some of the leaders of the outside groups.”

Furthermore in the post, the congresswoman described herself as both “Pro-life and Compassionate,” as if she was balancing two competing ideals, rather than two unified goals.

The registered nurse told National Journal her opposition to the bill was rooted in her concern that young Americans supported abortion rights and that fighting to protect the unborn was bad for the image of the Republican Party.

In addition to pulling her name as a co-sponsor, Ellmers worked with the House Republican leadership on ways to delay the vote of the pain-capable bill or otherwise weaken its provision that would have encouraged women to report their rapist to law enforcement.

The talks between House GOP leadership and Ellmers, who is married to surgeon Brent R. Ellmers, struck at the heart of the rebooted pro-life movement tactics. On one track, the pro-life movement is focusing the current system as the willing partner of men abusing underage females. The other track, sets asides arguments about the humanity or viability of unborn children, and instead deals with the pain inflicted on the unborn.

In the end, the bill was pulled from the House calendar by leadership—just as hundreds of thousands of advocates for the unborn were mustering for the annual March for Life.

Professor John H. Aldrich, the Pfizer-Pratt professor of political science athttp://www.duke.edu/, said while people can blame Ellmers for killing the pain-capable bill, the fault lies with the House GOP leadership.

“They could easily have crafted a perfectly strong and acceptable bill that she would have been happy to support and that the pro-life activists would have been happy to tolerate, maybe even genuinely support,” he said. “But, the leadership simply blew it and didn’t pay attention to the full set of strong pro-life GOP members of Congress in their own chamber.”

The aftershocks from pulling of H.R. 36 are still being felt

Capitol Hill conservatives and supporters of restoring legal protections to the unborn are still trying to understand the depths of the betrayal by Ellmers and the House GOP leadership. In the days before the March for Life, as the conspiracy to tank the bill was playing out in the offices just below dome, leadership liaisons to conservatives bragged to them that the passage of the pain-capable bill would prove that the Republican leadership will deliver legislation for the pro-life community.

Tami Fitzgerald, the executive director of the North Carolina Values Coalition, a IRS registered 501 (c) (4) organization, said she got wind of the Ellmers flip on the Friday before the March for Life.

Fitzgerald said she called Ellmers’ office to verify rumors that the congresswoman was working against the pain-capable bill, and while she was not put through to the congresswoman, but she was directed to Chief of Staff Albert G. Lytton.

In that conversation, Lytton confirmed that Ellmers was working against H. R. 36. “I got the impression that the staff was surprised but was going ahead with it.”

The pro-life leader said she was disgusted that Ellmers chose to play the abortion issue for political advantage rather that sticking to principles. “I have always believed that good policy is good politics.”

Professor Andrew J. Taylor, the chairman of the political science department at the School of Public and International Affairs at North Carolina State University, said Ellmers was elected in 2010 as part of a greater national conservative wave, but necessarily as an opponent of abortion.

Taylor said Ellmers scored points as a defender of tobacco against new regulations from the Obama administration and an opponent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In fact in that year, Ellmers was the only Republican to take a seat from an incumbent Democrat in North Carolina.

The professor said he was not convinced that Ellmers will be hurt by her behavior surrounding the pain-capable bill.

“My sense is that 2016 will be about something else. They only way it could hurt her in in an inter-party dispute, which would encourage a primary challenge,” he said.

The fact is nobody knows what the campaign of 2016 will be about, he said.

Aldrich said the abortion issue is a very important in North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District, located in the central part of the state and includes Fort Bragg, the home of the airborne and special forces.

“More to the point, it is one that her side of the activist extremes care a lot about, very deeply,” he said. “Her district is likely a bit more conservative than the state as a whole, and her activist core base certainly is.”

Ellmers taking on the pro-life movement in Washington comes as the local movement in North Carolina is working to close abortion clinics and restrict the procedure.

“She made it pretty close to her defining issue when she first entered politics, her background as nurse and Catholic made this a genuine concern of hers,” he said. “The prospect of getting criticized from those she was virtually a part of must be difficult for her.”

 

In a Jan. 21 Facebook post, the congresswoman said: “To clear up any misinformation, I will be voting tomorrow to support H.R. 36 – The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protect Act Resources bill. I have and will continue to be a strong defender of the prolife community.”

The post not only distorted her moves against the bill, but also shifted her support from the unborn to the people fighting for the unborn—in effect announcing that she was not longer of the pro-life movement, but was now a sympathetic outsider.

Consistent with her new outsider posture, Ellmers dug in her high heels with aJan. 30 post on her official blog, when she dressed down the advocates for the unborn: “I am appalled by the abhorrent and childish behaviors from some of the leaders of the outside groups.”

Furthermore in the post, the congresswoman described herself as both “Pro-life and Compassionate,” as if she was balancing two competing ideals, rather than two unified goals.

The registered nurse told National Journal her opposition to the bill was rooted in her concern that young Americans supported abortion rights and that fighting to protect the unborn was bad for the image of the Republican Party.

In addition to pulling her name as a co-sponsor, Ellmers worked with the House Republican leadership on ways to delay the vote of the pain-capable bill or otherwise weaken its provision that would have encouraged women to report their rapist to law enforcement.

The talks between House GOP leadership and Ellmers, who is married to surgeon Brent R. Ellmers, struck at the heart of the rebooted pro-life movement tactics. On one track, the pro-life movement is focusing the current system as the willing partner of men abusing underage females. The other track, sets asides arguments about the humanity or viability of unborn children, and instead deals with the pain inflicted on the unborn.

In the end, the bill was pulled from the House calendar by leadership—just as hundreds of thousands of advocates for the unborn were mustering for the annual March for Life.

Professor John H. Aldrich, the Pfizer-Pratt professor of political science athttp://www.duke.edu/, said while people can blame Ellmers for killing the pain-capable bill, the fault lies with the House GOP leadership.

“They could easily have crafted a perfectly strong and acceptable bill that she would have been happy to support and that the pro-life activists would have been happy to tolerate, maybe even genuinely support,” he said. “But, the leadership simply blew it and didn’t pay attention to the full set of strong pro-life GOP members of Congress in their own chamber.”

The aftershocks from pulling of H.R. 36 are still being felt

Capitol Hill conservatives and supporters of restoring legal protections to the unborn are still trying to understand the depths of the betrayal by Ellmers and the House GOP leadership. In the days before the March for Life, as the conspiracy to tank the bill was playing out in the offices just below dome, leadership liaisons to conservatives bragged to them that the passage of the pain-capable bill would prove that the Republican leadership will deliver legislation for the pro-life community.

Tami Fitzgerald, the executive director of the North Carolina Values Coalition, a IRS registered 501 (c) (4) organization, said she got wind of the Ellmers flip on the Friday before the March for Life.

Fitzgerald said she called Ellmers’ office to verify rumors that the congresswoman was working against the pain-capable bill, and while she was not put through to the congresswoman, but she was directed to Chief of Staff Albert G. Lytton.

In that conversation, Lytton confirmed that Ellmers was working against H. R. 36. “I got the impression that the staff was surprised but was going ahead with it.”

The pro-life leader said she was disgusted that Ellmers chose to play the abortion issue for political advantage rather that sticking to principles. “I have always believed that good policy is good politics.”

Professor Andrew J. Taylor, the chairman of the political science department at the School of Public and International Affairs at North Carolina State University, said Ellmers was elected in 2010 as part of a greater national conservative wave, but necessarily as an opponent of abortion.

Taylor said Ellmers scored points as a defender of tobacco against new regulations from the Obama administration and an opponent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. In fact in that year, Ellmers was the only Republican to take a seat from an incumbent Democrat in North Carolina.

The professor said he was not convinced that Ellmers will be hurt by her behavior surrounding the pain-capable bill.

“My sense is that 2016 will be about something else. They only way it could hurt her in in an inter-party dispute, which would encourage a primary challenge,” he said.

The fact is nobody knows what the campaign of 2016 will be about, he said.

Aldrich said the abortion issue is a very important in North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District, located in the central part of the state and includes Fort Bragg, the home of the airborne and special forces.

“More to the point, it is one that her side of the activist extremes care a lot about, very deeply,” he said. “Her district is likely a bit more conservative than the state as a whole, and her activist core base certainly is.”

Ellmers taking on the pro-life movement in Washington comes as the local movement in North Carolina is working to close abortion clinics and restrict the procedure.

“She made it pretty close to her defining issue when she first entered politics, her background as nurse and Catholic made this a genuine concern of hers,” he said. “The prospect of getting criticized from those she was virtually a part of must be difficult for her.”